Dietary Supplement Users are More Likely to Receive Necessary Nutrients, Make Better Health Decisions

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Often enough, especially recently, Natural News has been fending off mainstream medical attacks on supplements. The mainstream media supports whatever biased and bogus reports mainstream researchers release, probably because a lot of advertising money comes from Big Pharma and the rest of the Medical Mafia.

And also because of what Mike Adams said in a December 17, 2013, Natural News article: “Mainstream media reporters are, by and large, outrageously ignorant about nutrition, isolated nutrients, whole foods, the games Big Pharma plays, the corruption of the science journals and so on.”

The most recent supplement and multivitamin attacks got a lot of favorable press. And they gave the ghoulish Dr. Paul Offit of “babies can tolerate 1,000 vaccinations at the same time” fame another platform for promoting his new book that rails against vitamin and mineral supplements, herbs and Linus Pauling.

Although not with same impact as the attacks on supplements that were featured in several major mainstream outlets, a counterattack has been launched and recently published as a study in the peer-reviewed Nutrition Journal.

Naturally, the lamestream media hasn’t run with the story and probably won’t even walk with it.

Here’s what the Council for Responsible Nutrition (CRN) published

The study was titled “Health Habits and Other Characteristics of Supplement Users.”

CRN conducted a mega-study of 20 different peer-reviewed scientific journal articles and found that, “overall, the evidence suggests that users of dietary supplements are seeking wellness and are consciously adopting a variety of lifestyle habits that they consider to contribute to healthy living.”

CRN noted that over half of US supplement users were covered in the 20 studies they reviewed. Contrary to the notions spread by supplement naysayers, most of those surveyed used supplement-based strategies to bolster better food choices instead of using supplements to replace the nutritional void from poor food choices and sedentary lifestyles.

In other words, supplement users were not ignoring food for nutrition. The mega-study determined that those who took supplements also made better nutritional choices with foods than their non-supplement consumer counterparts, who usually made poorer food choices.

The study revealed that enriching or fortifying foods helped increase nutritional values, but combining supplements with whole foods had more impact toward increasing nutritional intake. There was no mention of organic food comparisons in the CRN press release.

But the study’s bottom line that supplement users were more concerned about taking responsibility for their health and were doing so successfully could be what the medical mafia doesn’t want others to know. Ya think?

The most ignored supplements are the most important – minerals

In 1936, journalist Rex Beach covered a maverick MD’s agricultural research in a lengthy article published in Cosmopolitan magazine. The MD, Dr. Charles Northen, had turned to soil science, because he realized that nutrition is the basis of health, and our crops, even in 1936, were lacking minerals due to poor top soil mineral balances.

He advocated doing what small organic farmers are discovering now, ways to balance the soil’s mineral composition so that synthetic fertilizers and pesticides wouldn’t be necessary, and the crop foods would be more nutritious.

“Bear in mind that minerals are vital to human metabolism and health [emphasis added] – and that no plant or animal can appropriate to itself any mineral which is not present in the soil upon which it feeds,” asserted Dr. Northen. “Lacking vitamins, the system can make some use of minerals, but lacking minerals, vitamins are useless.”

The article was entered into the U.S. Senate archives as Senate Document 264, 74th Congress, 1936. Of course, it went nowhere. Big Ag flourished with the “Green Revolution” in the mid-1940s, and things only got worse until the organic food movement accelerated after the 1960s.

Minerals are even more important than vitamins. For example, most Americans are magnesium deficient, yet magnesium is involved in over 300 cellular metabolic processes. And vitamins don’t perform as well without minerals.

There are macrominerals, measured in milligrams, and trace minerals, measured in micrograms. Both types are essential, because the body doesn’t manufacture them. They should be taken from food, but most food coming from depleted top soils are lacking. So mineral supplements are necessary.

Just what types of mineral supplements are most effective is covered very well by the iconoclastic chiropractor Dr. Tim Shea of the Doctor Within.

Latest Studies Show that Glyphosate Causes Gluten Intolerance

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The incidence of gluten intolerance, celiac disease and other health problems linked to the consumption of wheat and gluten are on the rise world wide and seem to be reaching epidemic proportions. But while wheat, and more specifically gluten, have traditionally been blamed for this modern epidemic, new evidence points to glyphosate, the active ingredient in Monsanto’s Roundup herbicide, as being a probable cause or contributor to this rapidly increasing health crisis.

It would seem that in recent times gluten has been blamed for more and more chronic health problems. In fact it’s got to the point where gluten has commonly become the first suspect when trying to resolve many health issues and removing it from the diet often helps.

But the question is why? Why after thousands of years of eating wheat, are humans suddenly becoming intolerant to it? Why is it causing all these diseases and health problems that used to be rare or non-existent?

It is because of the breeding? Has wheat been changed from what it used to be? Maybe. Or maybe it’s the glyphosate.

What is glyphosate and how does it affect my health?

Glyphosate is the active ingredient in Monsanto’s number one selling herbicide Roundup. Roundup is used worldwide on many crops for both weed control and harvesting. Billions of liters of Glyphosate are used on crops around the world every year and use of the herbicide is increasing dramatically with the largest amounts by far being used on Roundup resistant GM crops.

Since its inception, the effects on human health of glyphosate have been studied with many such studies pointing to severe consequences to human health resulting from exposure or ingestion. Consequences such as cancer and endocrine disruption have been shown to be common.

However more recent studies show that as glyphosate use has risen, so has gluten intolerance and researchers have discovered that glyphosate disrupts and damages the digestive system causing Celiac disease, gluten intolerance and IBS. Some of these studies have found that not only is our food supply commonly contaminated with glyphosate, but water supplies are also being contaminated.

Glyphosate has been shown to damage liver cells, break down junctions in the gut wall leading to leaky gut syndrome, kill enzymes and disrupt gut flora leading to diseases of the digestive system and thereby impacting the rest of the body.

For those affected by gluten intolerance, removing gluten from the diet is often the obvious answer to distressing symptoms. However in light of the recent studies it may be likened to shutting the gate after the horse has bolted. With prevention in mind, these studies provide a good case for eating organic food, avoiding GM foods and removing foods that are likely to have been sprayed with glyphosate from our diet.

 

Got funky Breath? Here are Some Causes – and Fixes

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Got chronic halitosis? If you do, chances are that your friends haven’t told you, because, well, they’re your friends and they don’t want to hurt your feelings. But halitosis — bad breath, as it is more commonly known — is a common problem, so you might have a problem and just not know it.

How common is halitosis? According to the Academy of General Dentistry, about 80 million people suffer from chronic bad breath. But there is good news: Finding a cure for this embarrassing condition is very much possible, if you first know what causes it.

For many people, the solution lies in what they eat; that’s because certain foods, like garlic and onions, are huge contributors to bad breath. What’s more, after they have been digested, odor-causing agents then travel through the bloodstream and are emitted through the lungs. Avoiding these foods — or, at least, cutting back on them — reduces halitosis.

Also, as reported by Guardian Liberty Voice:

Yet other cases of bad breath are due to poor oral hygiene. When food particles are trapped between the teeth, bacteria start to break them down releasing noxious odors. While regular brushing is a good start on preventing this type of bad breath, it is also important to floss, use mouthwash (those containing chlorine dioxide are a good choice) and even brush the tongue. The tongue is often a surprising source of bacteria-induced odor and regular usage of a tongue scraper can make a big difference in how fresh a person’s breath is. Regular visits to the dentist to detect and prevent gum disease are also important.

Some causes have nothing to do with the mouth

If a person has had poor dental hygiene for a long period of time, seeing a dentist is the first step in reversing a history of halitosis. Dentists can spot whether bad breath is being caused by gum disease — a condition that can develop due to poor hygiene. When a person neglects to see his or her dentist for years at a time, coupled with poor brushing/cleaning habits, plaque can build up on teeth, which can then cause a buildup of bacteria in the mouth. Toxins from the bacteria then irritate gums, and the entire process leads to funky breath.

Tobacco use can also cause bad breath, especially chewing tobacco, and the only way to fix this cause is to not chew or smoke tobacco. Besides causing a number of other physical health problems, tobacco use can also cause stained teeth, gum irritation and inability to taste foods.

Certain medicines and medical conditions can also cause halitosis. For instance, medications that cause dry mouth can leave a person with unpleasant breath.

Bad breath can also be caused by conditions that have nothing to do with the mouth or teeth. For instance, chronic lung, sinus and throat infections can certainly cause sufferers to have chronically bad breath. In addition, stomach ulcers, acid reflux and hiatal hernia, the latter of which causes regurgitation of food, can also cause bad odors.

So, what to do about the problem? Here are some possible fixes:

–Always practice good dental hygiene. Spend time every morning and evening, before you go to bed, brushing your teeth and flossing with a good floss. The time you put into this will pay off in terms of fresher breath.

–Invest in a good mouthwash. [Editor’s note: This item has been removed by me because the writer’s suggestion was not accurate. Antibacterial mouthwash is useless and full of toxic chemicals.]

–Reconsider your diet. You like spicy foods — got it. But maybe cutting down on them or giving up certain foods altogether is something that you should think about.

–Don’t be afraid to bring it up with your doctor. He or she may be able to help you pinpoint the problem and direct you to a cure.

For his part, our editor Mike Adams, the Health Ranger, recommends chlorophyll. It’s Mother Nature’s amazing green cleaning machine, and the more you take, the cleaner you get, he says.

 

Plateau! How to Get Over the Flatline

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Every dieter’s experienced it: The dreaded weight loss plateau. You’ve been cruising along smoothly for months, and suddenly, your weight loss stops. Plateaus can be incredibly frustrating. You may not feel as though you’ve made any changes to your diet and fitness routine, but you’ve stopped dropping the weight. If you’ve hit a plateau, it’s time to check and recheck your behavior so you can jump-start your weight loss and get back in the game. Let’s look at some ways you can increase the effectiveness of your diet plan, so that you can continue to drop weight.

Revisit your food journal

Beginning dieters are often advised to keep a food journal, so that they can stay aware of what they’re eating each day. Often, though, as weight loss picks up, the food journal falls by the wayside. When you hit a plateau, it may be time to start writing down everything you eat again. You may find that certain foods trigger small binges that are holding you back, that you’re eating more calories than you’d estimated, or that you’re right on target. Keeping a food journal for a week or two will provide you with the information you need to start getting back on track.

Measure your portion sizes carefully

Once you’ve been dieting for awhile, it’s tempting to stop counting calories and measuring portion sizes. You’ve got the hang of the system, after all, and you understand the correct portion sizes for most of the foods that you eat. If you hit a plateau, however, it may be time to reevaluate your portion sizes and start to measure and count again. It only takes a few extra calories per day to stall your weight loss plan. You’ll quickly end up maintaining your current weight instead of dropping the pounds you want to lose.

Switch to a different physical activity

If you find yourself skipping workouts, having trouble dragging yourself to the gym or simply not exercising as much as you need to for weight loss, it may be time to consider switching up your physical activity. If you’ve been jogging, consider swimming or hiking instead. Regular cardiovascular exercise is key to weight loss, so choose a physical activity that you enjoy and will look forward to doing, instead of one that you hate the thought of. This will make it easier to exercise on a regular basis.

Check your food labels

Take the time to check your food labels thoroughly, even if they’re foods you’re familiar with. Manufacturers change package sizes from time to time, which could make a difference in calorie counts, fat content and more. If you’ve hit a weight loss plateau, it may be time to assess the foods that you consume on a regular basis and re-read their labels. You may be surprised to learn that a serving size has changed, or that a food simply has more fat, calories or sugar than you’d remembered it having. Careful calorie counting is one important key to weight loss, and label reading is an important part of this process.

Diet plateaus are almost always temporary, so don’t stress too much about yours. Instead, focus on healthy lifestyle changes, such as eating cleanly and getting regular cardiovascular exercise. It’s only a matter of time before your weight begins to drop again, and you’ll soon be well on your way to achieving your weight loss goal.

 

2 Simple Changes to Boost Weight Loss Naturally Each Morning

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breakfast tips to burn fat

Many Americans completely skip breakfast and the majority of those don’t eat whatever’s convenient. But if you need to lose weight or have trouble controlling your hunger then you should consider taking a little extra time in the morning to fix a high-protein breakfast.

bad-rep-eggWhy You Should be Eating Eggs for Breakfast

Forget the pancakes. Forget your grainy cereals. Forget the granola bar. The answer may come straight from the farm: eggs. Recent studies clearly indicate that eating eggs can help you eat less and curb your hunter – and not just for a few hours, but for more than a full day.

Study 1

In a study released by The Obesity Society (reported by the University of Missouri-Columbia) at their annual meeting in Atlanta last year, women ages 18 to 55 who ate high-protein (30-39g) breakfasts were not as hungry that morning as those who ate something like pancakes (or skipped breakfast altogether). Study release date: November 14, 2013

Study 2

A previous study that was published in the American Journal of Clinical Nutrition that included 20 women ages 18 to 20 who were either obese or overweight. Some had a breakfast of cereal and some had a high-protein breakfast (35g) of lean beef and eggs. Both breakfasts had the same amount of calories (350), same amount of fiber, sugar, fat and energy density.

There were many controls in place during this study. Periodically throughout the day, blood samples were taken. Also, a brain scan was performed before dinner using functional magnetic resonance imaging. They were looking for brain signals that directly affect food motivation and eating behaviors that are reward-seeking. Of course, participants were required to complete questionnaires.

The findings showed women who ate the high-protein breakfast were more satisfied and less hungry. The brain activity found during the scans showed a very low volume of activity in areas of the brain that are known to affect cravings.

More interesting is that this persisted into the evening hours. They didn’t snack on sugary, high-fat foods as much as the other group.

Study 3

Yet another study was published on National Center for Biotechnology Information. 30 obese or overweight women participants were given either eggs for breakfast or bagels, both of which had the same number of calories.

The women who had eggs for breakfast ate less calories. Not just for the morning or for lunch, but for an amazing 36 hours.

Study 4

Yes, there’s still more! This study by the International Journal for Obesity included both men and women who were obese or overweight, but otherwise healthy. This study was also larger, using 152 participants.

happyeggThey ate either bagels or eggs for breakfast. They were split into four groups:

  • Egg group
  • Egg diet group (lower calorie diet overall)
  • Bagel group
  • Bagel diet group (lower calorie diet overall)

Those in the egg diet group lost a significantly more weight than the bagel diet group. They also reduced their BMI by over 60% more, reduced waist circumference by nearly 35% more and reduced body fat by over 15% more.

Add More Protein – Period

If you’ve been shying away from meat, don’t. Simply be eating more protein, you can fire up your fat burning, build more muscle and reduce your appetite. There have been numerous studies that clearly indicate protein can help you effortlessly eat less and lose weight. One of the many can be found here.

One of the most interesting studies, though, showed that if you include protein as 30% of your daily calories, you could drop over 400 calories per day without even realizing it. That’s because you feel full and satisfied, thus not eating as much. You can find full details on this particular study here.